33 results
 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

GEBCO's aim is to provide the most authoritative publicly-available bathymetry of the world's oceans. It operates under the joint auspices of the International Hydrographic Organization(IHO) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) (of UNESCO).

GEBCO produces and makes available a range of bathymetric data sets and products. This includes a global bathymetric grid; gazetteer of undersea feature names, a Web Map Service and printable maps of ocean bathymetry.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

Bio-ORACLE is a set of GIS rasters providing geophysical, biotic and environmental data for surface and benthic marine realms. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Linking biodiversity occurrence data to the physical and biotic environment provides a framework to formulate hypotheses about the ecological processes governing spatial and temporal patterns in biodiversity, which can be useful for marine ecosystem management and conservation.

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 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

The Gridded Population of the World, Version 4 (GPWv4): Population Density, Revision 11 consists of estimates of human population density (number of persons per square kilometer) based on counts consistent with national censuses and population registers, for the years 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015, and 2020. A proportional allocation gridding algorithm, utilizing approximately 13.5 million national and sub-national administrative units, was used to assign population counts to 30 arc-second grid cells.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

The dataset contains a range of different Pacific regional maps developed by the SPREP GIS team and is available for use by members and partners.

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 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

Dataset regarding 'Seamounts' - peaks that rise over 1,000 m above the seafloor. Seamount chains occur in all three major ocean basins, with the Pacific having the most number and most extensive seamount chains.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

A direct internet link to and resources pertaining the Blue Habitat website which has been established as a portal for information on the global distribution of marine ‘blue’ habitats. Knowledge on the distribution of blue habitats is an important input into ocean management, marine spatial planning and biodiversity conservation.

 SPREP Island and Ocean Ecosystems (IOE)

Maps and associated data from the Turtle Research and Monitoring Database System (TREDS). A summary of the database can be found below.

The Turtle Research and Monitoring Database System (TREDS) provides invaluable information for Pacific island countries and territories to manage their turtle resources. TREDS can be used to collate data from strandings, tagging, nesting, emergence and beach surveys as well as other biological data on turtles.

a mapping representation of active and passive continental margins, oceanic plate boundaries and mid ocean spreading ridges

statistical records as of 2014 on the distribution of seamount. Accordingly, there are more seamounts in the Pacific Ocean than in the Atlantic, and their distribution can be described as comprising several elongate chains of seamounts superimposed on a more or less random background distribution (Craig and Sandwell)

The Gridded Population of the World, Version 4 (GPWv4): Population Density, Revision 11 consists of estimates of human population density (number of persons per square kilometer) based on counts consistent with national censuses and population registers, for the years 2000. A proportional allocation gridding algorithm, utilizing approximately 13.5 million national and sub-national administrative units, was used to assign population counts to 30 arc-second grid cells.

The Gridded Population of the World, Version 4 (GPWv4): Population Density, Revision 11 consists of estimates of human population density (number of persons per square kilometer) based on counts consistent with national censuses and population registers, for the year 2005. A proportional allocation gridding algorithm, utilizing approximately 13.5 million national and sub-national administrative units, was used to assign population counts to 30 arc-second grid cells.

The Gridded Population of the World, Version 4 (GPWv4): Population Density, Revision 11 consists of estimates of human population density (number of persons per square kilometer) based on counts consistent with national censuses and population registers, for the year 2010. A proportional allocation gridding algorithm, utilizing approximately 13.5 million national and sub-national administrative units, was used to assign population counts to 30 arc-second grid cells.

The Gridded Population of the World, Version 4 (GPWv4): Population Density, Revision 11 consists of estimates of human population density (number of persons per square kilometer) based on counts consistent with national censuses and population registers, for the year 2015. A proportional allocation gridding algorithm, utilizing approximately 13.5 million national and sub-national administrative units, was used to assign population counts to 30 arc-second grid cells.

The Gridded Population of the World, Version 4 (GPWv4): Population Density, Revision 11 consists of estimates of human population density (number of persons per square kilometer) based on counts consistent with national censuses and population registers, for the year 2020. A proportional allocation gridding algorithm, utilizing approximately 13.5 million national and sub-national administrative units, was used to assign population counts to 30 arc-second grid cells.

Raster data representing the mean levels of chlorophyll in mg/m3 for the surface water layer. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Marine data layers for present conditions were produced with climate data describing monthly averages for the period 2000–2014, obtained from pre-processed global ocean re-analyses combining satellite and in situ observations at regular two- and three-dimensional spatial grids.

Raster data representing the mean levels of nitrate in µmol/m3 for the surface water layer. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Marine data layers for present conditions were produced with climate data describing monthly averages for the period 2000–2014, obtained from pre-processed global ocean re-analyses combining satellite and in situ observations at regular two- and three-dimensional spatial grids.

Raster data representing the mean levels of phosphate in µmol/m3 for the surface water layer. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Marine data layers for present conditions were produced with climate data describing monthly averages for the period 2000–2014, obtained from pre-processed global ocean re-analyses combining satellite and in situ observations at regular two- and three-dimensional spatial grids.

Raster data representing the mean levels of dissolved oxygen in µmol/m3 for the surface water layer. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Marine data layers for present conditions were produced with climate data describing monthly averages for the period 2000–2014, obtained from pre-processed global ocean re-analyses combining satellite and in situ observations at regular two- and three-dimensional spatial grids.

Raster data representing the mean levels of phytoplankton in µmol/m3 for the surface water layer. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Marine data layers for present conditions were produced with climate data describing monthly averages for the period 2000–2014, obtained from pre-processed global ocean re-analyses combining satellite and in situ observations at regular two- and three-dimensional spatial grids.

Raster data representing the mean levels of silicate in µmol/m3 for the surface water layer. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Marine data layers for present conditions were produced with climate data describing monthly averages for the period 2000–2014, obtained from pre-processed global ocean re-analyses combining satellite and in situ observations at regular two- and three-dimensional spatial grids.