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 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Mangroves are very special and unique trees.Mangroves are among the few trees that can grow in sea water as well as in places where the saltwater mixes with the fresh water from the land.
Mangroves grow in places with muddy soil and a protected shoreline. They live in large groups called "mangrove forests".
The mangrove forest is home to many different types of plants and trees.
Available online
Call Number: [EL]
Physical Description: 4 Pages

 MNRET - Ministry of Natural Resources, Environment & Tourism, Palau

The Nature Conservancy’s Mapping Ocean Wealth Project: Modelling and mapping fishing pressure the current and potential standing stock of coral-reef fishes in five jurisdictions of Micronesia

 National Museum of Natural History

Williamson and Sabath (1982) have demonstrated a significant relationship between modern population size and environment by examining atoll area and rainfall in the Marshall Islands. The present work seeks to extend that argument into prehistory by examining the relationship of ancient habitation sites and size of aroid pit agricultural systems to atoll land area and rainfall regime along the 1,500-3,500 mm precipitation gradient in the Marshall Islands.

 The University of Waikato

What is the nature of vulnerability and resilience to climate change at the community scale in Pacific island countries (PICs)? What approaches to climate change adaptation

 International Maritime Organisation (IMO)

Following the introduction by the delegation of the United States of it's list of considerations for ocean fertilization the Working Group agreed to model the assessment framework on ocean fertilization after the "Risk Assessment and Management Framework for C02 Sequestration in Sub-seabed Geological Structures (CS-SSGS), adopted in 2006.
Available online
Call Number: [EL]
Physical Description: 31 p.

 Smithsonian Institution

Fruit bats of the genus Pteropus are considered to be strong fliers (Kingdon, 1974; Nowak and Paradiso, 1983), with some species commuting distances of 10-50 km between day roosts and feeding areas (Breadon, 1932; Ferrar, 1934; Hall, 1983; Lim,
1966; McWilliam, 1985-1986; Ratcliffe, 1932; Taylor, 1934; Walton and Trowbridge, 1983). Longer seasonal movements of > 100 km are known for several species of Australian Pteropus, which change roosting sites in response to shifting patterns in the

 Environment Australia

This report presents a set of indicators, referred to as the 'core' set. for reporting on the state of the environment across Commonwealth and State and Territory jurisdictions. The core indicators have been developed by the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) through an extensive consultation process involving both government agencies and the general public.
Available online
Call Number: [EL]
Physical Description: 96 p.

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 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

The Takitumu Conservation Area was created in 1996 on the island of Rarotonga in the Cook Islands. Its main purpose is to conserve biodiversity for the benefit of present and future gen-
erations. Only local people own the land and its resources. Ecotourism will be the area's main economic activity. A guided nature walk has been organized with landowner agreement and
support.
Available online
Call Number: [EL]
Physical Description: 4 Pages

 Smithsonian Institution

Agroforestry, the planting and protection of trees and tree like plants as integral components of a polycultural agricultural system, has always been central to the

 Earthscan Publications Ltd

The Tefisi community was concerned of the possible adverse effect of soil being eroded into their coastal environment affecting the marine lives in the areas. In Tefisi, the surface soil is washed away from land development sites, farmland and the settlement areas in every significant rainfall. The fine soil particles flow into the coastal marine environment unchecked, causing the otherwise clear marine environment to become turbid. The outflow of soil not only destroys the ecosystems of the coastal environment, but seriously impacts the local fishery.
Available online

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)

The Government of Papua New Guinea has developed this National Marine Spill
Contingency Plan (NATPLAN) as part of its commitment to protecting its and our
valuable coastal and marine resources from the threat of marine pollution
incidents.
NATPLAN has been developed to reflect the essential steps necessary to initiate,
conduct and terminate an emergency spill response on, or into the navigable
waters of Papua New Guinea, on the adjoining shorelines, the waters of the
contiguous zone or into waters of the exclusive economic zone.

 University of New South Wales

Integrating community based disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA)
is identified at the policy and practical level as crucial to aid effectiveness. Successful integration
reduces both duplication of efforts and confusion at the community level. This research focuses
on Pacific community based DRR and CCA initiatives, and draws upon the knowledge and insight
of key stakeholders from multiple backgrounds to develop an understanding of the current status

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 MNRET - Ministry of Natural Resources, Environment & Tourism, Palau

Data on Reef Fish Recovery in countries and information is also useful for Palau's Reef Fish Biomass

 Government of FSM,  Government of PNG,  Government of the Solomon Islands

The present submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf
('the Commission') is made by the Federated States of Micronesia, Papua New
Guinea and the Solomon Islands (hereinafter referred to collectively as ‘the three
coastal States’) pursuant to paragraph 8 of Article 76 of the 1982 United Nations
Convention on the Law of the Sea ('the Convention') in support of the establishment
by the three coastal States of the outer limits of the continental shelf that lie beyond

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

Available online|each book hold dvd
Call Number: [EL],550 SOP
Physical Description: various pagings ; 29 cm

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 Capacity Building to Enable the Development of Adaptation Measures in Pacific Islands Countries,  Cook Islands (CBDAMPIC)

Specifically the Community Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment was conducted to make it possible for the people of Aitutaki to tell the CBDAMPIC project team what climate related

 City Council

Brisbane City Council manages almost half the city's wastes through one of the most efficient and safe waste systems in the world. A state-of- the-art fleet of dedicated waste trucks and waste and recycling single pass trucks can collect both recyclable material and waste from the kerbside. Recyclable material is taken to Materials Recovery Facilities (MRF) for processing. Waste is transported to centrally located transfer stations. From the transfer station the waste is bulk hauled
to fully engineered, double sealed landfills with full gas recovery and leachate treatment.

 Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity/UNEP

This brochure demonstrates how measures and policies can be shaped to simultaneously address climate change, biodiversity loss and poverty. It identifies opportunities for synergies and mutual enhancement of the objectives of international agreements, particularly the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), as well as decisions taken by the United Nations (UN) General Assembly following the recommendations of the UN Forum on Forests (UNFF).
Available online|1 copy

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 Smithsonian Institution

This paper attempts to provide a comprehensive listing and analysis of Kiribati plant names, along with the corresponding Latin, English, and selected Pacific-island vernacular names for plant species with recognized Kiribati vernacular names. The study focuses on those species found on the 16 islands

 PIGGAREP/SPREP

Climate change has been recognized by Pacific Forum Leaders as one of the most serious threats to the region. The Pacific islands have already experienced, and will continue to experience the adverse effects of climate change and these are expected to worsen over the coming decades. For some low lying atoll countries, climate change may even threaten their very existence, as confirmed by the recently published Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, AR4.
Also available online|Also contain Cd-rom
Call Number: 338.9 PAC [EL]